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SLA/noSLA: step 1


Keksz
09-06-2008, 22:40
Yeah, I know. 101Mbps is the margin.

hyster
09-06-2008, 15:36
Quote Originally Posted by Andy
That can only happen if they have more than one server and use a total of 101Mbps or more between the servers. It cannot happen if you only have one server with a single 100Mbps port.
I think Andy has made this clear. If you own one server only it is impossible for you to be put on noSLA as you can not attain 101Mbps.

Hopefully all is clear my friend

Andy
09-06-2008, 12:48
Quote Originally Posted by Keksz
Than please edit here the first post (with the new information, like an update), because many from new customers will check that and get confused... and like me they wont order a gigabit link...
The help document is at the top of the forum for a reason; it contains the latest up to date information. You shouldn't rely on old posts.

Anyway, the new noSLA method is actually less limiting than the previous so you would actually get better performance than the old method. And as stated you can reach 1Gbps without problems.

Keksz
09-06-2008, 10:05
Quote Originally Posted by Andy
What you have written was the old noSLA method. That is no longer in effect.
Than please edit here the first post (with the new information, like an update), because many from new customers will check that and get confused... and like me they wont order a gigabit link...

Andy
08-06-2008, 17:02
You obviously mis-understood what I wrote. I know you can get put into noSLA on a 1Gbps server, I even said that in the article. I know the article it accurate as many have agreed. What you have written was the old noSLA method. That is no longer in effect.

SLA = No limits on peering or transit
noSLA = Unlimited peering and 20Mbps per server per transit link for transit (there are 5 transit links)

Keksz
08-06-2008, 15:45
You wrote into your FAQ regarding a 1GBps link:

You can only be put onto noSLA mode if you have more than one 100Mbps server or one or more servers with a 1Gbps connection.

The noSLA mode means for me that you will have not always the 1Gbit speed (if the destination can do that!):

- from 5pm to 11pm // very strongly
- from 9am to 5pm and from 11pm to 1am // lightly limitations

this means resctricted on transit(!), ulimited on peering

in the other times IT IS unlimited everywhere (1am -> 9am)

You can be switched into noSLA mode with 1Gbit server, and it can happen if your upload is continously over 101Mbps...

Yes, and you can get also 1Gbit with noSLA, if you do the transfer on peering
or you have several connections through transit, like 5x10mbit or 5x30mbit... + peering.

Andy
08-06-2008, 14:12
Quote Originally Posted by Keksz
Hi there,

I don't know why you can't understand this SLA/noSLA difference. It has been written very well in the first post, and as you can see there, not so much servers are affected. So be not scarry And I guess 10 or 30MBps / transit in the high used hours it isn't a big problem...

quote from OLES:
I was very surprised (and happy) that we have only 274 dedicated
server in noSLA mode since we host nearly 30'000 dedicated servers.
It means that there is less that 1% of the dedicated server that
will have noSLA bandwidth (0.91%). It means that we worked for
the 0.91% of our customers and I'm happy that we are so extremist
to make happy our customers.


You can be afraid if you have a 1Gbit server and you have all the time upload over 101MBits, than you will be capped. But ONLY your UPLOAD. Am I right?

Respect,
Keksz
Let me make it clear that there is no capping. You can still get the full 1Gbps.

Please read the help document at the top of the main forum. It contains all the information you will need about SLA and noSLA.

Keksz
08-06-2008, 13:41
Hi there,

I don't know why you can't understand this SLA/noSLA difference. It has been written very well in the first post, and as you can see there, not so much servers are affected. So be not scarry And I guess 10 or 30MBps / transit in the high used hours it isn't a big problem...

quote from OLES:
I was very surprised (and happy) that we have only 274 dedicated
server in noSLA mode since we host nearly 30'000 dedicated servers.
It means that there is less that 1% of the dedicated server that
will have noSLA bandwidth (0.91%). It means that we worked for
the 0.91% of our customers and I'm happy that we are so extremist
to make happy our customers.


You can be afraid if you have a 1Gbit server and you have all the time upload over 101MBits, than you will be capped. But ONLY your UPLOAD. Am I right?

Respect,
Keksz

Andy
06-06-2008, 23:44
Quote Originally Posted by hyster
Ouch so its best to have only one server then and do all work with that.
Not necessarily. It depends what you want to do. A forum for example might use just 10Mbps of bandwidth when the servers CPU and Memory is maxed out. You might need several servers to run your forum and you may never reach 100Mbps.

However, as I previously stated, most users won't even know the difference between SLA and noSLA unless they do a lot of high speed file transfers all over the world.

I have several forums running on my server, of which I have members in over 30 countries, including USA, Canada, France, UK, Germany, Spain, Russia, Australia, Netherlands... etc. Page load times are less than 3 seconds in all countries.

hyster
06-06-2008, 23:33
Ouch so its best to have only one server then and do all work with that.

moddie1
06-06-2008, 23:27
right they put both servers together thank you

Andy
06-06-2008, 21:50
Quote Originally Posted by moddie1
so if we have 2 servers we get put in to no sla thats what i am hearing
No. You get put into noSLA, IF you exceed 100Mbps average bandwidth when adding together all of your servers bandwidth.

moddie1
06-06-2008, 21:48
so if we have 2 servers we get put in to no sla thats what i am hearing

Andy
04-04-2008, 14:49
Quote Originally Posted by BELLonline
I hope that's the case, because that's very good I probably wouldn't even notice being put in to noSLA mode.
I think it is a good compromise. I am in SLA, and can never be out of SLA since I only have one 100Mbps server so it doesn't affect me just yet.

BELLonline
04-04-2008, 14:47
I hope that's the case, because that's very good I probably wouldn't even notice being put in to noSLA mode.

Andy
04-04-2008, 14:40
Quote Originally Posted by BELLonline
Yeah, I'm still not sure which one of the following is true:

1) Each person downloading from your server is capped at 10Mbit/s over paid carriers per connection

2) You can transfer a maximum of 10Mbit/s over each paid carrier but no limit on peering

3) You can get a maximum of 10Mbit/s over all combined paid carriers and unlimited peering

It seems like a lot of people shout about OVH ripping them off because theier server is capped at X but I think they might just be downloading from their server and expecting transfer rates of 100Mbit/s which is rarely possible on a single connection anyway.
I think its number 1. Each person is limited to a maximum of 10Mbps per carrier per connection.

BELLonline
04-04-2008, 14:37
Yeah, I'm still not sure which one of the following is true:

1) Each person downloading from your server is capped at 10Mbit/s over paid carriers per connection

2) You can transfer a maximum of 10Mbit/s over each paid carrier but no limit on peering

3) You can get a maximum of 10Mbit/s over all combined paid carriers and unlimited peering

It seems like a lot of people shout about OVH ripping them off because theier server is capped at X but I think they might just be downloading from their server and expecting transfer rates of 100Mbit/s which is rarely possible on a single connection anyway.

Andy
04-04-2008, 14:24
Quote Originally Posted by BELLonline
It's all a bit confusing isn't it - I think this is probably done on purpose.

As far as I can tell, the only bandwidth that is capped is to the carriers that OVH pay for, peering isn't capped at all. You don't get any caps during quiet times.
That sounds about right.

It is confusing I agree, but its not such an easy subject to explain. It took me a while to understand it but I still can't find a better way to explain it.

BELLonline
04-04-2008, 14:17
It's all a bit confusing isn't it - I think this is probably done on purpose.

As far as I can tell, the only bandwidth that is capped is to the carriers that OVH pay for, peering isn't capped at all. You don't get any caps during quiet times.

oles@ovh.net
03-04-2008, 13:32
> To be honest tho it wouldnt be that easy to use the whole 100mbit.

non. because during 12 hours per day you can get 1Gbps in noSLA.


Andy
02-04-2008, 21:58
Quote Originally Posted by slayer2005
To be honest tho it wouldnt be that easy to use the whole 100mbit.
I mean ive used around 12tb on my gbit with 12 days left.
So to actualy use the full 100mbits would be fantastic quality from ovh.
If i can averdage 15-20tb of traffic a month i wil be happy.
You can happily use that much bandwidth with no scrutiny from OVH.

slayer2005
02-04-2008, 20:29
Quote Originally Posted by Andy
100Mbps SLA

After 100Mbps you are put into no-SLA mode if seen fit by OVH. If you don't use over 100Mbps a lot, you may stay in SLA mode.

To be honest tho it wouldnt be that easy to use the whole 100mbit.
I mean ive used around 12tb on my gbit with 12 days left.
So to actualy use the full 100mbits would be fantastic quality from ovh.
If i can averdage 15-20tb of traffic a month i wil be happy.

Andy
02-04-2008, 19:17
Quote Originally Posted by slayer2005
So im on this server.EG CORE2DUO LARGE gbit
How much bandwidth can i use in SLA mode.1000mbits?or is it still 100mbits burstable to gbit.?

And how would it perform in noSLA mode.
Im really curious on this now.

regards
100Mbps SLA

After 100Mbps you are put into no-SLA mode if seen fit by OVH. If you don't use over 100Mbps a lot, you may stay in SLA mode.

slayer2005
02-04-2008, 19:10
So im on this server.EG CORE2DUO LARGE gbit
How much bandwidth can i use in SLA mode.1000mbits?or is it still 100mbits burstable to gbit.?

And how would it perform in noSLA mode.
Im really curious on this now.

regards

Marco
02-04-2008, 17:54
The SLA mode is the one which is not capped.

The noSLA mode is the mode in which is capped.

You can find out in which status is your server by logging into your manager=> click into your dedicated server => on your right hand side there is a list of specifics in which there is also the "BP Type". There you can see if your server has been capped.

If your server has been capped and you are not happy, you can still send an email to oles@ovh.net, explaining which are your needs.

If there is anything else you are unsure about, please do not hesitate to contact us at customersupport@ovh.co.uk and we would be more than happy to help you.

I hope that helped.

benji123
02-04-2008, 17:02
Coxy69 if you need any help send me a email i have my own datacenter

benji123
02-04-2008, 16:42
Quote Originally Posted by Andy
Its already been mentioned. If you use over 101Mbps or more consistently, then your server gets set to noSLA.
i rang up ovh today and i asked it it 100mbps unmeaterd full dedicated bandwith there reply was yes i think ovh needs to start thinking about paying for the extra bandwith if somone wants a server with no caps they shud be able to have one and whats the point of 100mbps if ya gona cap the port?

Coxy69
02-04-2008, 16:33
I would like to try my 1GB/s [ns27966.ovh.net] server in no SLA mode yet i can no longer switch :/

I found when using the little kimi that no-SLA gave me personnally a better performance.

How is it i go about doing the switch now?

Thanks in Advance

Coxy [ Nichandle: CD12569-OVH ]

-8[Email Sent to this effect too]8-

Andy
19-03-2008, 15:05
Quote Originally Posted by milanyc
OK we know that. duh. But im CLEARLY talking here about users with one 100mbit server. they also get switched to noSLA mode when ovh guys decide to do so. Question is what makes them do that?
That can only happen if they have more than one server and use a total of 101Mbps or more between the servers. It cannot happen if you only have one server with a single 100Mbps port.

milanyc
19-03-2008, 13:56
Quote Originally Posted by Andy
Some servers have a Gbps port so it is totally possible to use 101Mbps or more.
OK we know that. duh. But im CLEARLY talking here about users with one 100mbit server. they also get switched to noSLA mode when ovh guys decide to do so. Question is what makes them do that?

Andy
19-03-2008, 13:33
Quote Originally Posted by milanyc
How in the world can i use more than 100mbit if i have only one 100mbit server?
Thats exactly what ive been trying to figure out. Why some users with one server get switched into noSLA, and what does it take?
Some servers have a Gbps port so it is totally possible to use 101Mbps or more.

milanyc
19-03-2008, 13:28
Quote Originally Posted by Andy
Its already been mentioned. If you use over 101Mbps or more consistently, then your server gets set to noSLA.
How in the world can i use more than 100mbit if i have only one 100mbit server?
Thats exactly what ive been trying to figure out. Why some users with one server get switched into noSLA, and what does it take?

Andy
19-03-2008, 13:15
Quote Originally Posted by milanyc
Thats some serious data exchange. Glad you cleared that out.
Wonder how much data is too much for an SLA server, and what does trigger the noSLA switch....
Its already been mentioned. If you use over 101Mbps or more consistently, then your server gets set to noSLA.

milanyc
19-03-2008, 13:06
Thats some serious data exchange. Glad you cleared that out.
Wonder how much data is too much for an SLA server, and what does trigger the noSLA switch....

Andy
19-03-2008, 12:12
Quote Originally Posted by milanyc
95mbit sustained transfer for 6 hours is more data than you could fit on one kimsufi hard disk... Are you sure of what youre talking about mate?
You never specifically said a kimsufi server, you said

There is NO WAY that we can ever achieve 100mbit on a single SLA server. However, if you wanna deal with the capping restrictions during certain times of the day, you can actually get 100mbit on a noSLA server.
which does not mention kimsufi in any way.

milanyc
19-03-2008, 11:45
Quote Originally Posted by Andy
You can, because I've done it several times before. I sent some data to a swedish client to his 100Mbps residential connection and he achieved 95Mbps throughput sustained for around 6 hours while he downloaded his data.

OVH cannot legally offer 100Mbps if the connection is not physically capable of it.
95mbit sustained transfer for 6 hours is more data than you could fit on one kimsufi hard disk... Are you sure of what youre talking about mate?

Andy
19-03-2008, 11:34
Quote Originally Posted by milanyc
There is NO WAY that we can ever achieve 100mbit on a single SLA server. However, if you wanna deal with the capping restrictions during certain times of the day, you can actually get 100mbit on a noSLA server.
You can, because I've done it several times before. I sent some data to a swedish client to his 100Mbps residential connection and he achieved 95Mbps throughput sustained for around 6 hours while he downloaded his data.

OVH cannot legally offer 100Mbps if the connection is not physically capable of it.

milanyc
19-03-2008, 11:18
Quote Originally Posted by Andy
So going by that, we can infact use 100Mbps for every server we have, on the understanding that its a maximum of XXMbps per connection made to the server, meaning we might not be able to max it out because of this limitation?

Its confusing stuff!
There is NO WAY that we can ever achieve 100mbit on a single SLA server. However, if you wanna deal with the capping restrictions during certain times of the day, you can actually get 100mbit on a noSLA server.

Andy
19-03-2008, 11:12
So going by that, we can infact use 100Mbps for every server we have, on the understanding that its a maximum of XXMbps per connection made to the server, meaning we might not be able to max it out because of this limitation?

Its confusing stuff!

BELLonline
18-03-2008, 22:54
Hmm, just looking through other posts, and it seems like it's only limited per connection not the server itself being capped:

To sum up , noSLA is:
- Total bandwidth per server is not limited. You are entitled to 100Mbps or 1Gbps (according to the offer).
- Bandwidth per connection
- Between 0h and 9am: 10 Mbps per connection
- Between 9am and 3pm: reduce of 5 Mbps to 500 Kbps per connection
- Between 3 pm and 9pm: 500 Kbps per connection
- Between 9pm and 11pm: re-increase 500Mbps to 5Mbps per connection
- Between 11pm and midnight: 10 Mbps per connection

That's pretty good to be honest, I don't really need more than that much per connection

Bruno
18-03-2008, 22:26
Quote Originally Posted by BELLonline
is it when the transfer of all of your servers together reach over 100Mbit/s??)
101 Mbps

BELLonline
18-03-2008, 21:32
Thanks for that Andy, it kind of almost makes sense now I think haha. It would be good if a member of staff could clarify this, with an explanation of what could cause the server to go in to noSLA mode (is it when the transfer of all of your servers together reach over 100Mbit/s??)

Andy
18-03-2008, 18:08
OK let me see here, see if I have this right... From what I have read and understood its the following:

In SLA mode, the minimum speed you will get is 100Mbps.

When in noSLA mode, the minimum speed you will get is 10Mbps on each transit network depending on the time of day (either 10Mbps or 30Mbps).

This means if you have data going to France Telecom and Global Crossing, you can have 10Mbps on EACH transit network, so you can in fact have 20Mbps, this is 10Mbps on each.

I think this is right, and makes sense from what I have read, since it says "10Mbps on Teleglobe + 10Mbps on Global Crossing + 10Mbps on T-System + 10Mbps to France Telecom + 10Mbps to Free + no limit on the peering" with "+" meaning "plus", not "or".

Obviously I'd like oles or someone to confirm this.

Andy
18-03-2008, 18:01
Quote Originally Posted by BELLonline
thanks for that, I'm just trying to get my head around the bandwidth policies just so I know exactly what I can get away with haha

To be honest, 10Mbit/s for £15+vat is a pretty good deal in itself, I was just reading this:



So it looks like people with one server are able to get more from that one server than if they had many servers - so bandwidth is kind of limited per customer to a certain extent?

Basically...

You can have 100Mbps SLA on one server
or
You can have up to 100Mbps SLA per server when bandwidth is under 100Mbps then noSLA on all servers if above 100Mbps.

As long as the total bandwidth is under 100Mbps, you stay on SLA mode, otherwise its noSLA and the limits change.

I -think- thats right. Someone from OVH will have to confirm. It is confusing, I agree.

I think I'll write all this down and see if I can come up with a better way of explaining it.

BELLonline
18-03-2008, 17:45
thanks for that, I'm just trying to get my head around the bandwidth policies just so I know exactly what I can get away with haha

To be honest, 10Mbit/s for £15+vat is a pretty good deal in itself, I was just reading this:

- you need 1 high quality server with 5Mbps, 10Mbps, 100Mbps SLA
bandwidth ? you will be happy with Ovh.
- you need 2-3-5 servers with 10Mbps, 20Mbps SLA per server ?
you will be happy with Ovh.
- you need 20-40-200 servers with 20Mbps SLA per server ?
you will be happy with Ovh.
So it looks like people with one server are able to get more from that one server than if they had many servers - so bandwidth is kind of limited per customer to a certain extent?

Andy
18-03-2008, 17:13
Quote Originally Posted by BELLonline
Hello,

First of all, I've only been with OVH for just over a month but am happy with the quality of service so far

I've just signed up here and was reading through this post, to clear things up:

I see that customers like myself with multiple servers are unable to use the full 100mbit/s connection on all servers, which is fair enough for the price. Are you saying that with several servers, I'm guaranteed 20mbit/s on each server before being capped? If so then this is a great deal on bandwidth
You can use the full 100Mbps on each but the bandwidth is only guaranteed to a certain point at certain times of the day. If you need to do this then they will put you into no-sla mode so there are different limits. But in practice only 10Mbps is always guaranteed. It is higher depending on the time of day.

BELLonline
18-03-2008, 17:03
Hello,

First of all, I've only been with OVH for just over a month but am happy with the quality of service so far

I've just signed up here and was reading through this post, to clear things up:

I see that customers like myself with multiple servers are unable to use the full 100mbit/s connection on all servers, which is fair enough for the price. Are you saying that with several servers, I'm guaranteed 20mbit/s on each server before being capped? If so then this is a great deal on bandwidth

milanyc
10-03-2008, 00:47
Its actually removed today. I couldnt switch it myself thats why i emailed you.
THanks for switching it off for me.

oles@ovh.net
09-03-2008, 23:08
milanyc a écrit:
>
> With the SLA ON, my upload speeds were pretty much stuck at about
> 10-15mbit/s, constantly. Once i turned SLA off in my manager, i was


you can't change the SLA or noSLA mode. this option will be removed
tomorrow.


milanyc
09-03-2008, 22:18
With the SLA ON, my upload speeds were pretty much stuck at about 10-15mbit/s, constantly. Once i turned SLA off in my manager, i was maxing out the speeds. Since you guys disabled the option to turn on/off the SLA in our manager, i had to email you about this.
Thanks for switching it back off for me.

oles@ovh.net
09-03-2008, 21:54
> Maybe in theory, but try testing your speeds with SLA on vs off.

do you have the problem with the SLA ?


milanyc
09-03-2008, 20:56
Quote Originally Posted by Bruno
If a person has only 1 server it can't do more than 100Mbps because it is a physical limit on the NIC. If the server is an EG (or greater), its different : if > 101Mbps -> noSLA.
Maybe in theory, but try testing your speeds with SLA on vs off.

Cheers.

Bruno
09-03-2008, 12:03
Quote Originally Posted by milanyc
no more than 101Mbs means exactly what if a person has only 1 server?
If a person has only 1 server it can't do more than 100Mbps because it is a physical limit on the NIC. If the server is an EG (or greater), its different : if > 101Mbps -> noSLA.

milanyc
09-03-2008, 11:30
Quote Originally Posted by oles@ovh.net
milanyc a écrit:
>
> Can you also explain what speeds do you guarantee with SLA on on a
> 100mbit server. I know its not the full 100mbit. Is it 20mbit?


in SLA, you have full 100Mbps. lot of people do it on our network.
it's crazy but it works. no problem for us. but no more that 101Mbps.
if not => noSLA.
no more than 101Mbs means exactly what if a person has only 1 server?

oles@ovh.net
09-03-2008, 11:28
milanyc a écrit:
>
> Can you also explain what speeds do you guarantee with SLA on on a
> 100mbit server. I know its not the full 100mbit. Is it 20mbit?


in SLA, you have full 100Mbps. lot of people do it on our network.
it's crazy but it works. no problem for us. but no more that 101Mbps.
if not => noSLA.


milanyc
09-03-2008, 10:45
And since you've explained the way you cap the speeds on noSLA mode, could you also explain what speeds do you guarantee with SLA ON, on a 100mbit server. I know its not the full 100mbit 24/7. Is it 20mbit with bursts up to 100mbit?

Thanks.

milanyc
09-03-2008, 10:30
I sent you an email oles@ovh.net

Thanks.

oles@ovh.net
08-03-2008, 13:00
Subject: SLA/noSLA: step 1

Hi There,
I announced this week that Ovh will propose the same offers on all
markets (FR, DE, ES, PL and UK). The same offer means: 100Mbps SLA
without traffic limit per month. This offer was proposed in FR 1-2
years ago (with some modifications), then we proposed it in DE & ES,
and now in PL & UK. This offer works fine and is a big commercial
success in FR, and now in DE/ES (hope will be in PL/UK) since we can
propose a big quality of the bandwidth with a high quality hardware.
SLA means quality quality quality with a big network with lot of
10G links to the transits and the peering. Out network capacity
is nearly 200Gbps (!!) and we use about 80/90Gbps right now. And
the high quality hardware hosted in our own datacentres. Hardware
SLA means 2 hours or 4 hours max to repair a down server. Our staff
works 24 hours per day, 7 days a week to propose this SLA.

Who are the customers that we work for ?
----------------------------------------
- you need 1 high quality server with 5Mbps, 10Mbps, 100Mbps SLA
bandwidth ? you will be happy with Ovh.
- you need 2-3-5 servers with 10Mbps, 20Mbps SLA per server ?
you will be happy with Ovh.
- you need 20-40-200 servers with 20Mbps SLA per server ?
you will be happy with Ovh.

Who are NOT the customers that we work for ?
--------------------------------------------
- you need 2-3 servers with 80Mbps per server.
- you need 20-40-200 servers with 60Mbps per server.

But some customers said us "Okay. You don't want to work for us
because I need 20-40 servers with 80Mbps. I have no money to
pay the SLA bandwidth. But I don't need SLA bandwidth. I just need
the no limit of transfer. No limit of Gb/month for the same price.
I have the download services, youtube-like services and I don't
need the quality and the high performance of the bandwidth. Can you
propose me something ?".

Before we said "No, we have no solution for you". Right now, we can
since we worked on the "noSLA" bandwidth.

What is noSLA bandwidth ?
-------------------------
Our network works 24 hours per day. But we don't use all bandwidth
all the time. For example right now:
- from 1am to 9am we use < 40Gbps
- from 9am to 5pm it's between 40Gbps/80Gbps.
- from 5pm to 11pm it's 80Gbps
- from 11pm to 1am, it's between 40Gbps and 80Gbps.
So we worked on noSLA bandwidth saying:
- from 5pm to 11pm, we limit the traffic very strongly
- from 9am to 5pm and from 11pm to 1am, we limit the traffic very
lightly but there is some limitations
- from 1am to 9am, we don't limit the traffic (like SLA).
It's perfect for the the download services, youtube-like services.
From 1am to 9am, the customers can get 10Gbps or more on 50-80
dedicated servers.

What do we limit in noSLA bandwidth ?
-------------------------------------
We only limit the "transit" traffic since we pay for it. And we
only limit out coming traffic.
No limit on the peering. No limit on the incoming traffic.

It means the traffic going "to Internet" thought Teleglobe, Global Crossing,
T-System and to France Telecom and Free is limited from 9am to 5pm, from 5pm
to 11pm and from 11pm to 1am.
No limit on FreeIX, Panap, Sfinx, Decix, Amsix, Linx, Bnix, and all private
peering (Neuf, Numericable, T-online, Alice, Ip-plus, Above, Global Crossing).

PS. it can change. if a private peering don't want us to send no limit traffic
to them.

What does it mean "very strongly" and "very lightly" on noSLA ?
---------------------------------------------------------------
- very strongly means "10Mbps per server per out coming link":
it means "(10Mbps on Teleglobe + 10Mbps on Global Crossing +
10Mbps on T-System + 10Mbps to France Telecom + 10Mbps to Free
+ no limit on the peering)/server"
- very lightly means "30Mbps per server per out coming link":
it means "(30Mbps on Teleglobe + 30Mbps on Global Crossing +
30Mbps on T-System + 30Mbps to France Telecom + 30Mbps to Free
+ no limit on the peerings)/server"
- no limit means "(100Mbps or 1Gbps)/server.

How do we decide how is in "noSLA" bandwidth ?
----------------------------------------------
I (Octave alias Oles) decide it. We have some good internal tools
to control the traffic of all servers on our network. The tools
says us "this server has to checked". Then I check it. And decide
if I change the mode of this bandwidth from SLA to noSLA. I check
if the SUM of all servers is > 101Mbps, if yes, I check if it's
only 1 or 2 servers or all servers, then decide which server or
all will be changed from SLA to noSLA.

How can you check which kind of bandwidth do you have ?
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This morning I checked ALL servers and changed the mode from SLA
to noSLA for 43 customers (using 274 dedicated servers). You
can check it in your manager. It's written "SLA" or "noSLA".
I do this job every 2-3 days. It's very quickly and easy to
find out the servers that are in noSLA mode.

I was very surprised (and happy) that we have only 274 dedicated
server in noSLA mode since we host nearly 30'000 dedicated servers.
It means that there is less that 1% of the dedicated server that
will have noSLA bandwidth (0.91%). It means that we worked for
the 0.91% of our customers and I'm happy that we are so extremist
to make happy our customers.

And if you are NOT happy ? Well, maybe in 0.91% of customers some
of them are still unhappy. Please, send me an email to oles@ovh.net
with you dedicated server and tell me what is your needs. I will
very happy to work on the 0.91% of the 0.91% of our customers

What is the step 2 ?
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Please check if you are in SLA or noSLA mode. If you are in noSLA
and you wonder why, please send me an email to oles@ovh.net with
your dedicated server and I will explain you why. Maybe I will
change my mind, maybe not.

Tomorrow I will add all thoses servers in the routers setup. I
did some good tests this week and we are ready to start noSLA
tomorrow (or Monday).

Regards,
Octave