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OCO: OvhCheckOut


neostorm
07-08-2008, 17:27
Hello,

The OCO and RTM generate a lot of log output on my RPS.
I have several lines per minute in the cron.log and even more in auth.log

This is very annoying when I try to check my logs, or to generate a digest of them.

Do you know a way to disable those log output? (without disabling completely the auth and cron logs, of course)

Thanks.

This is an example of what I find in my logs :

/var/log# tail -20 auth.log
Aug 7 17:27:01 severine CRON[4889]: pam_unix(cron:session): session closed for user root
Aug 7 17:27:06 severine CRON[4886]: pam_unix(cron:session): session closed for user root
Aug 7 17:28:01 severine CRON[4937]: pam_unix(cron:session): session opened for user root by (uid=0)
Aug 7 17:28:01 severine CRON[4940]: pam_unix(cron:session): session opened for user root by (uid=0)
Aug 7 17:28:01 severine CRON[4942]: pam_unix(cron:session): session opened for user root by (uid=0)
Aug 7 17:28:01 severine CRON[4942]: pam_unix(cron:session): session closed for user root
Aug 7 17:28:01 severine CRON[4940]: pam_unix(cron:session): session closed for user root
Aug 7 17:28:06 severine CRON[4937]: pam_unix(cron:session): session closed for user root
Aug 7 17:29:01 severine CRON[4996]: pam_unix(cron:session): session opened for user root by (uid=0)
Aug 7 17:29:01 severine CRON[4999]: pam_unix(cron:session): session opened for user root by (uid=0)
Aug 7 17:29:01 severine CRON[4999]: pam_unix(cron:session): session closed for user root
Aug 7 17:29:06 severine CRON[4996]: pam_unix(cron:session): session closed for user root
Aug 7 17:30:01 severine CRON[5047]: pam_unix(cron:session): session opened for user root by (uid=0)
Aug 7 17:30:01 severine CRON[5050]: pam_unix(cron:session): session opened for user root by (uid=0)
Aug 7 17:30:01 severine CRON[5053]: pam_unix(cron:session): session opened for user root by (uid=0)
Aug 7 17:30:01 severine CRON[5057]: pam_unix(cron:session): session opened for user root by (uid=0)
Aug 7 17:30:01 severine CRON[5057]: pam_unix(cron:session): session closed for user root
Aug 7 17:30:02 severine CRON[5053]: pam_unix(cron:session): session closed for user root
Aug 7 17:30:07 severine CRON[5047]: pam_unix(cron:session): session closed for user root
Aug 7 17:30:25 severine CRON[5050]: pam_unix(cron:session): session closed for user root



/var/log# tail -20 cron.log
Aug 7 17:24:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[4707]: (root) CMD (run-parts /usr/local/oco/bin/60sec >/dev/null 2>/dev/null)
Aug 7 17:25:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[4764]: (root) CMD (/usr/local/rtm/bin/rtm 41 > /dev/null 2> /dev/null)
Aug 7 17:25:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[4767]: (root) CMD (run-parts /usr/local/oco/bin/300sec >/dev/null 2>/dev/null)
Aug 7 17:25:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[4770]: (root) CMD (run-parts /usr/local/oco/bin/60sec >/dev/null 2>/dev/null)
Aug 7 17:26:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[4828]: (root) CMD (/usr/local/rtm/bin/rtm 41 > /dev/null 2> /dev/null)
Aug 7 17:26:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[4831]: (root) CMD (run-parts /usr/local/oco/bin/120sec >/dev/null 2>/dev/null)
Aug 7 17:26:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[4833]: (root) CMD (run-parts /usr/local/oco/bin/60sec >/dev/null 2>/dev/null)
Aug 7 17:27:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[4887]: (root) CMD (/usr/local/rtm/bin/rtm 41 > /dev/null 2> /dev/null)
Aug 7 17:27:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[4890]: (root) CMD (run-parts /usr/local/oco/bin/60sec >/dev/null 2>/dev/null)
Aug 7 17:28:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[4938]: (root) CMD (/usr/local/rtm/bin/rtm 41 > /dev/null 2> /dev/null)
Aug 7 17:28:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[4941]: (root) CMD (run-parts /usr/local/oco/bin/120sec >/dev/null 2>/dev/null)
Aug 7 17:28:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[4943]: (root) CMD (run-parts /usr/local/oco/bin/60sec >/dev/null 2>/dev/null)
Aug 7 17:29:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[4997]: (root) CMD (/usr/local/rtm/bin/rtm 41 > /dev/null 2> /dev/null)
Aug 7 17:29:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[5000]: (root) CMD (run-parts /usr/local/oco/bin/60sec >/dev/null 2>/dev/null)
Aug 7 17:30:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[5048]: (root) CMD (/usr/local/rtm/bin/rtm 41 > /dev/null 2> /dev/null)
Aug 7 17:30:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[5051]: (root) CMD (run-parts /usr/local/oco/bin/300sec >/dev/null 2>/dev/null)
Aug 7 17:30:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[5054]: (root) CMD (run-parts /usr/local/oco/bin/120sec >/dev/null 2>/dev/null)
Aug 7 17:30:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[5058]: (root) CMD (run-parts /usr/local/oco/bin/60sec >/dev/null 2>/dev/null)
Aug 7 17:31:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[5121]: (root) CMD (/usr/local/rtm/bin/rtm 41 > /dev/null 2> /dev/null)
Aug 7 17:31:01 severine /USR/SBIN/CRON[5124]: (root) CMD (run-parts /usr/local/oco/bin/60sec >/dev/null 2>/dev/null)

oles@ovh.net
11-03-2008, 12:08
OVH.Customer a écrit:
>
>> Regarding RTM, this enables you to get the information "calculable"
>> on the server, the load of the machine, the occupation of the hard
>> drive,
>> Use of CPU, RAM, and so on. You will also shortly get the graphs of
>> this information in the manager.

> I've asked this before but never got an answer. How do you get this to
> work on a Windows server or is it only compatible with Linux?


Hmm ... Windows let's me see it ...


OVH.Customer
10-03-2008, 22:10
Regarding RTM, this enables you to get the information "calculable"
on the server, the load of the machine, the occupation of the hard drive,
Use of CPU, RAM, and so on. You will also shortly get the graphs of this information in the manager.
I've asked this before but never got an answer. How do you get this to work on a Windows server or is it only compatible with Linux?

oles@ovh.net
10-03-2008, 13:00
Hello,

To monitor the RPS and to know whether they are functioning properly, or
if it doesn't have a read-only partition, or to find out that actually everything
is fine, we will use OCO.

What is OCO? OvhCheckOut was originally developed for
shared hostings at Ovh. It enables us to know the state of the
server in a binary way: "OK" or "KO". We have added over the time
the "OK, but" state. OCO is very fast and takes no time
Or CPU to run. It is a simple "cat" file.

OCO has been used for high availability hosting offers and
OCO works with any sort of monitoring, such as Mon, Slb, etc.
For monitoring, you just need to read the statements on Port 79.

# Telnet 79
Trying ...
Connected to .
Escape character is'^]'.
200 OK oco-1.14h
Connection closed by foreign host.

# Telnet 79
Trying ...
Connected to .
Escape character is '^]'.
350 KO oco-1.14h-300-http ,300-php ,300-php5
Connection closed by foreign host.

Using OCO is extremely simple and secure. The script checks
what you ask it to check (it can be if the WEB server
works, it can be a php script of databases verification, it
may be a verification that the hard drive is not broken, it can be
anything you want), and it updates the statements by test. On port 79
we can read the general state of the server and states that don't work properly.
If there is "200" everywhere, it means 'OK', if there is at least one
2XX, it means "OK, but," then if there is at least 3XX , it means "KO".

You can customize the check scripts: you start your
checks and if you get the result that you want, you create a file with
200 inside. Otherwise you create a file with 300. If the file has not
been updated for 5 minutes, it is in 300 even if there is 200 in the
file.

First OCO will be set up by default on all distributions
for RPS, then for all dedicated servers, as well as the
RTM. The monitoring of OCO with email and / or SMS alerts will be offered
in the manager on the same level as the monitoring of ports (port 80,
22, 23, 25, 53, 3306, 110, etc.), the performance of an URL, and
ICMP monitoring of the main and secondary IP. Some things
have already been developed but are not yet in the manager, others will
come soon.

The OCO system will enable you to create incidents automatically within Ovh
and to complete ongoing incidents. If you have a
5XX error, an incident is created and a team will manage your
Incident. You will then be able to follow your incidents and to resolve them
in a more advanced and totally personalized way. The SLA on the provided time
on the incidents will be offered as well.

Regarding RTM, this enables you to get the information "calculable"
on the server, the load of the machine, the occupation of the hard drive,
Use of CPU, RAM, and so on. You will also shortly get the graphs of this information in the manager.

Regards,

Octave